‘Tis the season for promposals

Bre Previdi ‘14
Business Manager

 

As the month of May quickly approaches, a majority of the senior class girls are nearly ready for prom. They have their puffy dresses, an idea of how they want to do their hair and nails, but almost any girl can say that they are stressed out about not having a prom date.
Girls go their entire lives wishing for a perfect prom with the perfect date– along with who asks them. According to the girls, it’s all about the “promposal.”
A promposal is when a boy proposes, or asks, a girl to prom. Every year the senior class is shocked by the inventive ways that boys ask a girl to prom, because it can be in front of a classroom, or even in front of the whole entire school. Some girls prefer getting asked in a more subtle way, and others prefer getting asked in a huge way.
“I’m expecting to get asked to prom in a little way, because I think it’s more important that it has sentimental meaning. Sometimes boys ask girls in front of tons of people just to feel like they asked in a better way,” Abby LaPorte ’14 said.
As girls have their expectations set high for prom, boys have their minds racing with tiny details about the proposal in general. Sometimes boys struggle to keep this big plan a secret, especially because there are so many things that have to be done before he asks.
During last year’s prom season, Andrew Jarmon ’13 asked Jenna Helsing ’15 to prom by incorporating her favorite sport, volleyball, into it. He decorated the entire gym with volleyballs strategically placed around a net, spelling out the word “prom.” Although she had no idea, Jarmon had a hard time keeping the big surprise away from Helsing.
“First you have to get her friends in on the plan, and make sure what you’re doing is good enough for the girl, because if not, you can very well ruin her only time she’s being asked to prom. Everything has to be perfect; you have to make sure that she has no idea, which is probably the hardest thing. The process is extremely hard, especially because you don’t want to ruin the girl’s perfect night,” Trevor Green ’14 said.
Matt Gross ’13 asked Sammi Pleiness ’14 to prom while wearing an actual dress…in front of the entire lunchroom! Not only did he need assistance with announcing her to come to the lunchroom and stage, but he also needed a friend’s dress to wear. Gross’ unforgettable promposal involved more than just him, but it was still kept a secret from Pleiness.
After a promposal is said and done and the festivities of prom die down, does everyone really remember each and every promposal? After the seniors graduate, is a promposal really all it’s made out to be? Alumni of LCN reminisce on promposals: sometimes they’re remembered; others, not so much.
“I think when boys ask girls to prom in a special way, it is awesome. All the guys try to outdo each other to create an unforgettable promposal, while girls are impatiently waiting for their date to ask. As long as the guy doesn’t do something completely crazy, like write her name in the sky, I think promposals are a great way to remember a special part of senior year!” Jacob Puma ’13 said.
Puma wouldn’t have had a fantastic time with his prom date from Anchor Bay if he didn’t think of a grand way to ask her (or so he claims). Last year, Puma coordinated a day to Skype one of his date’s classrooms and ask her with a ginormous sign saying “prom?” His date ended up saying yes, and they both had a fantastic time at LCN’s 2013 prom.
Promposals may be something girls hold near and dear to their hearts, and most of the time it is meant to be sentimental. Other than spring break, seniors look at prom as the highlight of senior year, and want it to be extremely special.

Hayley Tomich ‘14 stands with her prom date, Troy Tanzy ‘15, after his promposal.

Hayley Tomich ‘14 stands with her prom date, Troy Tanzy ‘15, after his promposal.