Thanksgiving Day Parade marches in

Anna Valentic ‘15

Cover Editor

 

 

 

Nancy Chambers, a human resources clerk at the LCPS administration building, and several other volunteers pose for some pictures at the Thanksgiving Day Parade. She is a greeter posing with Clowney above.

Nancy Chambers, a human resources clerk at the LCPS administration building, and several other volunteers pose for some pictures at the Thanksgiving Day Parade. She is a greeter posing with Clowney above.

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The Thanksgiving Day parade in Detroit is a major event that happens annually. Each year the Parade Company makes the parade better than the previous year. People of all ages enjoy the parade, from toddlers to grandparents.

“A couple yearago, there was a trick bike on a half pipe while the float was going down the street,” Nathan Vance ‘18 said. “That was my favorite float.”

Most floats are constructed by many helping hands and a lot of work goes into building the perfect float. All of the floats that are in the Detroit Thanksgiving Day parade are crafted by volunteers. One of those volunteers is Nancy Chambers, a human resources clerk at the administration building.

“It is not the job I am assigned, it is the attitude I bring to it and my fellow volunteers always keep me smiling,” said Chambers. Sometimes Chambers gives tours to groups but she said, “I wear many hats.”

Overall, the parade brings excitement and happiness to all involved and to those who watch it.

Taylor Hill ‘15 was part of the Detroit Thanksgiving Day parade about seven years ago, but still remembers it to this day as a great experience. Hill was part of the clown group that was themed around Cirque du Soleil.

“It was fun being able to get dressed up and ride around on the little bike,” said Hill.

Though Hill was part of the clown group that year, the Big Heads are a group that participate in the parade annually.

The Big Heads have been around since 1940 and they include over 300 of people, according to the web site. The Big Heads are exactly what they sound like: they are usually corporate and community leaders dressed in costumes with big heads attached.

This isn’t the only unique thing about the Thanksgiving Day parade.

“There are so many different areas to explore in the Parade Company, and you don’t have to be artistic to work on these floats,” said Chambers. “There are even volunteers who drive the floats around the streets of Detroit and they are required to go to float driving school!”

Sammy Hyden ‘15 said, “My favorite float would’ve been the Wizard of Oz or the Monkeys Jumping on the Bed one.”

“This year I’m looking forward to watching the Thanksgiving Day parade and the Lions game on television with my family as we eat our Thanksgiving dinner,” said Landin Kircus ‘15.

The parade will be broadcast on television on Thanksgiving Day at 9 a.m. on WDIV Local 4.

Overall, the Parade Company works very hard and puts on the Detroit Thanksgiving Day parade every year. This Thanksgiving should be filled with clowns, Big Heads, float drivers and happiness.